Brinens and Things
ladydrace:

underappreciateddragonart:

Camouflage by Hagge

OMG THIS IS AMAZING! AND ADORABLE! *SQUUEEEE*

ladydrace:

underappreciateddragonart:

Camouflage by Hagge

OMG THIS IS AMAZING! AND ADORABLE! *SQUUEEEE*

cosmictuesdays:

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

Grilled cheese sandwiches are awesome, but grilled cheese from heaven delivered via parachute? That’s super awesome! And that’s exactly what has just started happening in New York City thanks to an Australian pop-up restaurant called Jafflechutes. We aren’t kidding, grilled cheese sandwiches really are falling from the sky and we wish we were in NYC right now.

"Jaffle" is an Australian term for grilled or toasted sandwiches. In 2013 three guys in Melbourne who really love jaffles (Adam, David and Huw) successfully crowdfunded their concept for delivering tasty jaffles via parachute - Jafflechute! One year later they decided to tempt Americans with the same offer, grilled cheese sandwiches delivered from on high. Their second fundraising campaign was a success and the jaffles are now descending to meet their destiny in the hands (and bellies) of hungry New Yorkers.

The setup is simple: The Jafflechutes crew posts when they’ll be working. Payment is submitted via PayPal and a delivery/drop time selected. At the appointed time the customer stands on an ‘X’ marked on the sidewalk outside the designated location and awaits the arrival of their very own jaffle. Provided the wind isn’t too strong, a yummy grilled cheese sandwich that’s been carefully wrapped up with a tiny parachute attached is then dropped from a window overhead.

But don’t worry if the wind is up. If your jaffle happens to get stuck in a tree, Jafflechutes says you won’t have to chase after it, they’ll make you another.

Click here to watch Jafflechutes in action.

Visit the Jafflechutes website to learn more. You can also follow them on Twitter and Instagram.

[via The Telegraph, USA Today, Gawker and Jafflechutes]

THIS IS THE BEST BUSINESS MODEL I HAVE EVER SEEN

Tempting! But where does one actually pay?

I think they only open for business occasionally, and take down the Paypal link when they’re not doing sales? That seems like the most plausible explanation for why I can’t find it anywhere.

exozoology:

rhamphotheca:

Sex? It all started 385 million years ago
It may not have been love as we know it, but around 385 million years ago, our very distant ancestors—armoured fish called placoderms—developed the art of intercourse.
So suggest a team of evolutionary scientists, who point to the fossil of a placoderm species blessed with the name of Microbrachius dicki.
Measuring about eight centimetres (four inches) in length, M. dicki lived in habitats in modern-day Scotland—where the first specimen was found in 1888—and in Estonia and China.
Placoderms have previously been found to be the most primitive jawed animal—the earliest known vertebrate forerunner of humans.But they now have an even more honoured…
(read more: PhysOrg)
illustration: Dr. Brian Choo/Flinders Univ.

So my Facebook newsfeed is filled with posts about this and people commenting that “Scots invented sex”! Which reminded me of this book called How the Scots Invented the Modern World! Fitting ;)

A somewhat more accurate answer to the literal meaning of “old as fuck”. (As I recall, that previous post used the specialisation of gamete types to define “fuck”.)

exozoology:

rhamphotheca:

Sex? It all started 385 million years ago

It may not have been love as we know it, but around 385 million years ago, our very distant ancestors—armoured fish called placoderms—developed the art of intercourse.

So suggest a team of evolutionary scientists, who point to the fossil of a placoderm species blessed with the name of Microbrachius dicki.

Measuring about eight centimetres (four inches) in length, M. dicki lived in habitats in modern-day Scotland—where the first specimen was found in 1888—and in Estonia and China.

Placoderms have previously been found to be the most primitive jawed animal—the earliest known vertebrate forerunner of humans.But they now have an even more honoured…

(read more: PhysOrg)

illustration: Dr. Brian Choo/Flinders Univ.

So my Facebook newsfeed is filled with posts about this and people commenting that “Scots invented sex”! Which reminded me of this book called How the Scots Invented the Modern World! Fitting ;)

A somewhat more accurate answer to the literal meaning of “old as fuck”. (As I recall, that previous post used the specialisation of gamete types to define “fuck”.)

Remember when you first discovered Tumblr and you would scroll down your dashboard until you reached the spot where you left the day before?

comparativelysuperlative:

Yeah, I remember doing that, back before I found out about…uh, what exactly is it that we competent people do instead? I’m asking for a friend.

There are multiple aspects to this post, I think.

"The day before" implies only checking Tumblr once a day.

"Scroll down" implies reading in reverse-chronological order, though that might not actually be considered strange or noobish. (I personally find the spot where I left off last time, then work my way up, making heavy use of the "k" shortcut.)

The primary implication, however, is that an experienced Tumblr user eventually ends up following so many people that they cannot keep up with their dash, and resort to only reading some of it. (I personally try very hard to avoid this, and have been known to unfollow or not-follow-in-the-first-place people because of them posting too much.)

maketreknotwar:

I FINALLY finished it! So someone- can’t remember who- gave me the prompt/idea of drawing a cardassian child/baby who was highly entertained by Julian’s smooth/ridgeless face
and
then cuteness happened

maketreknotwar:

I FINALLY finished it! So someone- can’t remember who- gave me the prompt/idea of drawing a cardassian child/baby who was highly entertained by Julian’s smooth/ridgeless face

and

then cuteness happened

nillson-the-fox:

So I’m a fan of odd drinkware, and this is the latest in my current collection.

The company that made it was Highwave and the Mug is called a Hotjo.

Company have been known to supply their mugs during the filming of Star Trek Deen Space Nine, if I’m not mistaken. But over the years the mug has gone through many revisions over the years. I was glad to find out that the company was still around that that the mug has not been discontinued and that it’s at an affordable price.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I must fill this up with some Raktajino.

I'm curious if you have any hypotheses about possible causes for human relationships existing on such a wide spectrum including anything from totally exclusive monogamy to totally inclusive polyerosy. The more I look, the more I notice humans seem to have more "relationship styles" than any other mammal and I can't help wondering if there's some genetic/instinctive/physiological reason behind it. Your thoughts?
Anonymous

koryos:

Well, to start with, I wouldn’t actually say that humans have more relationship styles than any other mammal. I think that the issue is that how we look at human behavior and how we look at animal behavior are very different things- obviously, we have a much more detailed and nuanced view of our own species than any other.

It’s important to remember that most science is consumed by the idea of the average. That is, if we were trying to write a description of how an animal behaves, we’d describe what we saw happening the most often. This is a useful way to look at things, because it allows us a way to generalize populations. But this does not mean that that is the only way that things will happen.

If you tally up the human species by culture, you will find that about 85% allow occasional or frequent polygyny (the practice of one man marrying multiple women). That’s a huge percent, and if an alien researcher were examining human behavior and saw that statistic, they might conclude that humans are overwhelmingly polygynistic.

Of course, it’s a little more complex than that, because even among cultures that permit polygyny, most men only marry one woman. Generally, in these cultures, having multiple wives relates to a man’s wealth and resources. This is similar to mating behavior in, say, the red-winged blackbird. Males with the best territory will often attract more than one female. This also occurs in red foxes, which all the literature will tell you are a monogamous species: under the right conditions, male foxes may take more than one female mate.

We, as humans, are familiar with many more relationships within our own kind than monogamy and polygyny, of course, but that’s because we live and breathe human behavior every single day. We rarely spend so much time with animals, particularly animals that are breeding, which is why we might assume that their behavior is static or can be easily categorized. This is simply false. The “averages” that science looks for are generally the widest part of a vast spectrum of behaviors.

Normally, what we find in animals is that the degree of behavioral flexibility relates to how specialized an animal is. If a species lives in only one type of environment, with only a few resources it is designed to use, it may not need the behavioral flexibility that leads to multiple mating types. The opposite is true for humans; we are arguably one of the best generalist species around. We live in a myriad of habitats utilizing a myriad of resources and thus, arguably, have the capacity to accommodate a range of sexual lifestyles.

This is, of course, a gross oversimplification of human behavior, as everybody who is human knows. It doesn’t at all take into account the individual- their desires, their values, their history, et cetera. This is a degree closer than most science goes, and it goes for humans as well as animals. Individual animals will have their own behaviors and preferences just like humans do. We just look at them from much further away than we do ourselves.

Further Reading:

Different trends in human culture: Gray, J. P. (1998). Ethnographic atlas codebook. World Cultures, 10(1), 86-136.

Not only are red-winged blackbirds polygynous about half the time, they also show a high degree of promiscuity and polyandry: Westneat, D. F. (1993). Polygyny and extrapair fertilizations in eastern red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus). Behavioral Ecology, 4(1), 49-60.

One study found that about half of red fox litters were not the product of a monogamous male-female couple; both polygyny and polyandry occurred among the remainder: Baker, P. J., Funk, S. M., Bruford, M. W., & Harris, S. (2004). Polygynandry in a red fox population: implications for the evolution of group living in canids?. Behavioral Ecology, 15(5), 766-778.

Greylag geese most often form male-female bonds, but under some circumstances they may form male-male or male-male-female bonds: Sommer, V., & Vasey, P. L. (Eds.). (2006). Homosexual behaviour in animals: an evolutionary perspective. Cambridge University Press.

Marmosets and tamarins display a range of mating styles, including polyandry, monogamy, and polygyny: Goldizen, A. W. (1988). Tamarin and marmoset mating systems: unusual flexibility. Trends in ecology & evolution, 3(2), 36-40.

These are all just examples of animals with highly flexible mating styles that I came up with off the top of my head. There are many more species where differing mating styles are less common and therefore less frequently documented, but still exist.

comparativelysuperlative:

carryonlordof221b:

This is exactly what snapchat was created for

Dissolving into puddles of laughter, send help.

libutron:

Golden Kukri Snake - Oligodon cinereus
With about 75 currently recognized species, the genus Oligodon (Colubridae) is one of the largest genera of Asiatic snakes. It is widespread throughout tropical south and southeast Asia. 
The geographic distribution of Oligodon is complex, and also its taxonomy. Several species are widespread and many have overlapping ranges. Oligodon cinereus (in the photo) is in fact a complex species with a highly variable coloring pattern.
These non-venomous snakes are usually nocturnal and often brightly colored. They feed primarily on the eggs of birds and reptiles. The morphology of their teeth is very effective for cutting open eggs, so much that the common name of the kukuri snakes derives from a distinctively shaped Nepalese knife, the kukri, because the hind teeth of the snakes are broad and strongly recurved, much like the shape of the kukri.
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Anne Devan-Song | Locality: Hong Kong (2012)

libutron:

Golden Kukri Snake - Oligodon cinereus

With about 75 currently recognized species, the genus Oligodon (Colubridae) is one of the largest genera of Asiatic snakes. It is widespread throughout tropical south and southeast Asia. 

The geographic distribution of Oligodon is complex, and also its taxonomy. Several species are widespread and many have overlapping ranges. Oligodon cinereus (in the photo) is in fact a complex species with a highly variable coloring pattern.

These non-venomous snakes are usually nocturnal and often brightly colored. They feed primarily on the eggs of birds and reptiles. The morphology of their teeth is very effective for cutting open eggs, so much that the common name of the kukuri snakes derives from a distinctively shaped Nepalese knife, the kukri, because the hind teeth of the snakes are broad and strongly recurved, much like the shape of the kukri.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Anne Devan-Song | Locality: Hong Kong (2012)

artxperiment:

wiggler

artxperiment:

wiggler